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Ward 17

Ward 17 is an acute surgical ward that specialises in upper GI and bariatric surgery.

We want your hospital stay to be the best that it can be. Ensuring that you have the best care and treatment while you are on our ward is really important to us.

If you are not happy with the care that we are providing please ask for the nurse in charge. We want to be able to answer and address your questions and concerns as soon as possible and improve your experience, or that of your relative, while you are here.

Your feedback will also help us improve the experience of other patients.

If you are having a good experience on our ward we would also like to hear from you.

You can contact the Ward 17 team by emailing ward17@rbch.nhs.uk

Latest news

Bay based nursing

Bay-based nursing stations are in place on Ward 17. The stations hold all the patient charts for the bay and basic medical equipment and mean patients are always within sight of staff, cutting down the need for them to use call bells.

Staff nurse Bridget Bush said:“It has improved communication between staff and patients and is more efficient. I love it. It is simple but effective and has made such a difference.”

Student nurse Zoe Ainsworth added:“It’s great for maintaining food and fluid charts - we can mark them off straight away without getting caught up with something else and forgetting in the interim.”


New initiatives

Staff on Ward 17 are proud to share the simple but effective initiatives that have made their daily work tasks more manageable: New wipe-clean admission folders are clearly labelled with the ward name, bay and bed number and hold all the medical notes for the patient’s current admission.

Dr Donald Barr, who also works across other wards, says that the folders are much easier to use: “Notes don’t tear and fall out as they do in the large folders and information is much easier to locate saving valuable time.”


Following their success and ease of use, the folders will be rolled out across the other surgical wards.

Each bed also has a magnetic patient board containing key information. There is also a section for magnetic task cards which act as a visual reminder: red cards denoting food and fluid tasks and black cards for all other tasks.


Student nurse Magda Pomichowska praised the boards, saying: “Care is more organised meaning we can spend more time with our patients.”

The boards will be rolled out across the Trust.

POD boxes (patient own drugs) are key coded boxes in each patient bed area which hold a patient’s own medication and drugs supplied from pharmacy.


Pharmacist Anita Balestrini said: “The keypad code maintains security and means staff don’t have to find keys while the glass front lets you see instantly whether there are any medicines inside. We are now piloting a 'self medication' for patients so they can access and self-administer their medicines from the cabinets. Results are looking promising.”